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  #1  
Old 01-28-2011, 11:59 AM
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Default Replacing oil pan and gasket

Anything trickey about replacing oil pan and gasket?

Was going to have local shop do it and they quoted 3 hours...
Looks to me like you drain the oil remove the 20 or so bolts, put on new gasket and new pan, then tighten everything back up... anything else need to come off for access or anything like that?
Thanks in advance,
Brian
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  #2  
Old 01-28-2011, 09:21 PM
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On what year, engine model car?

The exhaust pipe may need to be dropped.
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  #3  
Old 01-29-2011, 07:30 AM
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Default Changing oil pan

Quote:
Originally Posted by toyomoho View Post
On what year, engine model car?

The exhaust pipe may need to be dropped.
1998 Camry LE 2.2L 4cyl model SXV20L-AEPNKA - engine SFI 5S-FE
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  #4  
Old 01-29-2011, 02:20 PM
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Front exhaust pipe
A few exhaust system support brackets
Oil pan

It should be an OK job once you gain access to under the car.

The AutoZone website has detailed info on this engine in their vehicle repair guides 5S-FE.

I don't know if the car used an oil pan gasket or the sealant, the 1999 year did not have a gasket.

You can examine the seal between the pan and engine for a gasket or signs of squeezed out sealant. Oil pan gaskets are available from aftermarket sources for 98 and 99 if you want to go this route.

When removing the pan take precautions not be bend the gasket flange on the pan when it off the engine. Pan nut/bolt torque is 69 IN-LBF, not that much.

Might pickup new exhaust pipe gaskets in case the old ones are damaged. One at the exhaust manifold connection, one at the converter to exhaust pipe connection. Toyota recommends replacing the 3 exhaust nuts holding the pipe to the manifold by have never done this.

Look out for a possible 02 or A/F sensor installed in the pipe behind the converter.
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Old 01-31-2011, 10:23 AM
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Joey, Thanks for the info....
Well I put the car up on ramps saturday afternoon and went crawling around underneath. Wish I could wiggle under there without the ramps but it is too low to the ground!

Looks like my model definitely has a gasket and the front exhaust pipe definitely needs to come off to drop the pan. I picked up a new gasket and a new pan since the old one is really beat up. However when I started looking around I don't think it is the pan or gasket after all... I ended up spraying degreaser on everything and cleaning up all the oil I could find and I'm going under the car again this afternoon to see if I can see better what is leaking. Looks like it might be coming from the oil pump (right side when under the car looking up) or something to the left end of the motor. I had the dealership install a new timeing belt and oil seal a few months ago... could not tell if the oil was from that work or more recent. Thanks for the torq spec, I found a manual that said 48 in-lbs, but I thought that sounded a bit light. I'll check in again after I see what is up later today.
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Old 01-31-2011, 12:33 PM
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An oil pump seal leak will show up when the engine is running as the seal will under pressure.

To check for leaks, block the tires, set emergency brake and remove passenger tire (make sure the car is well blocked to prevent falling).

Start the engine, trans in park. Look for oil dripping from under the timing cover in the mid timing cover area, firewall side. If you suspect the pump is the problem start checking the oil level frequently. A seal drip can become 1 quart or more in lost oil in under 100 miles.

The oil pump seal can be replaced on the pump, unfortunately all the parts needed to change the belt will need to come off.
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:42 PM
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Joey,

Thanks again for your return post... this one and the other under the manual section...

I think that it is time to think about putting old bess out to pasture!

I'm so mad right now because I just put in a new water pump and changed the timing belt in April at the dealership... I told him to change gaskets on everything while he had the belts off, but as I look at my receipt, he recommended and changed the cam seal and power steering belt, but did not replace oil pump gasket. Why is it so hard to find a dealer that actually cares about their customers? (is that too harsh?) With 130k miles on the car am I expecting too much for the dealership to know to at least ask about the gaskets knowing that everything else he was replacing was original? I did not know what to specifically tell him, I figured they would do the right thing. Spoke with him today and he said tension rod is a more likely place for the leak than the oil pump and he will take a look if I bring the car in... Might give it a whirl, but it is starting to sound like an awful lot to sink into a 12+ year old vehicle.

Any advice? - wishing I had a crystal ball right now.

Regards,
Brian
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:11 PM
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For anyone else who might find this post... thought I would also include the laundry list of items theat need to be done - it is currently on a different thread...

Front to back!
Fix oil leak(s),
New caliper and due for new pads,
Replace both front stuts,
Replace both front sway bar links,
Replace rear struts,
Replace rear sway bar bushings,
fuel tank fill or vent leaking vapor. (I think there is a warrentee that will cover this one)
Transmission fluid flush,
Power stearing fluid flush,

Whatever else I find while taking care of the list!

After it is done still left with a 12 year old car with 150k miles.
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:05 PM
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Unless the pump was actually leaking the dealer would not have done anything. The seal most likely is either leaking or not as it is under pressure from the oil pump (unlike the cam and crank seals that are not under pressure). If leaking a dealer (or any other shop) would have told you as this is a bad leak. The dealer most likely would have changed the pump as this is faster then taking the pump apart and they typically don't repair these types of items (you can get the seal). An independent shop might repair the pump, but this takes time.

If you follow the approach outlined about you can see for yourself if the pump is leaking.

Not sure what a strut rod is?

As this car ages (and perhaps most cars) they enter a period of repairs, at least for early Camry once through this period repairs stop once again. If doing your own work these repairs are acceptable and cheaper then buying another car. If having a shop do the work the costs start to add up fast!

The car does not have that many miles, a well maintained Camry can last 300K. The issue is of course it will need the type of repairs you listed.

I suggest in the future you find an good independent shop as they charge less for parts and labor.

Determine where the leak is, then decide.

The most important issue is keeping the trans fluid clean (changing it,you don't want black, worn out fluid) along with the engine oil. You can do the PS fluid change yourself using by sucking out the fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster in which a section of hose has been attached (to allow access into the fill point on the reservoir). Does this a number of times over time and the fluid will be clean again.

Forget getting new struts unless they are leaking badly. The issues with the links and bushings, etc. are typically noise rather then function.

One thing to remember is the 1998 with this engine is a very good car. Yes it needs repair but the engine is strong unless hot rodded, run out of oil or coolant. The trans is good if the fluid is changed. Worn out fluid is the No 1 cause of all trans failure, not just Camry, the hotter it gets, the faster it wears out.

The chassis, etc is very good.

Given the choice I would rather have this car then most Camry models starting after 2001. I would never buy a new Camry today.
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Old 02-24-2011, 04:21 PM
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Oh man - need to smile... just came back to check the thread as I did not see the meesage of your post a few weeks back.

LOL I went and bought the new model!... Time will tell now.

The dealer said the leak was indeed the oil pump as I suspected. Also leaking around the distributer plug.

Will keep your advice in mind for the next time!

Looks like the new engine and tranny are same as the Avalon - figured that was a good thing. Why else you reserved about the new models?
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Old 02-24-2011, 04:21 PM
 
 
 
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1999, 5sfe, camry, connections, gasket, gaskets, intake, le, manifold, oil, pan, replace, replacing, toyata, toyoto

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