DIY - Do It Yourself Within you will find how-to's on many aspects of modding and caring for your ride as told by your fellow members.
Old 08-26-2015, 10:58 AM
How-Tos on this Topic
Last edit by: IB Advertising
See related guides and technical advice from our community experts:

Browse all: General Overview
Print Wikipost

'95 Camry Coupe DX Timing Belt Replacement

  #1  
Old 12-09-2012, 02:25 PM
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Siloam Springs, AR
Posts: 11
Default '95 Camry Coupe DX Timing Belt Replacement

I'm planning on doing the timing belt replacement myself. This is the biggest DIY car maintenance I've ever decided to attempt... just looking for any tips, suggestions, or warnings. I've ordered the Haynes Repair Manual for the Camry and will be using that as a reference for what tools I need to buy, and then also as a guide for doing the repair itself.
 
  #2  
Old 12-09-2012, 07:06 PM
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: PTW
Posts: 11,613
Default

The link may help.

http://www.justanswer.com/uploads/JH...ng_removal.pdf

If you not installing a Toyota brand belt forget the marks on the belt. Just align the cam and crank pulley as described and install belt.
 
  #3  
Old 12-10-2012, 11:36 AM
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Siloam Springs, AR
Posts: 11
Default

Thanks! Any suggestions or recommendations as to where I should buy the part? Not sure if I should visit a parts store in person (i.e. Autozone or O'Reilly's), or if I can get a better deal ordering online.
 
  #4  
Old 12-10-2012, 08:27 PM
Senior Member
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 965
Default

If you have time it's still better to get it in person, if it's too far and got other important things to do order it but make sure to get the best part.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-2012, 09:08 PM
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: PTW
Posts: 11,613
Default

If cash is not a concern I recommend a Toyota dealer belt. The issue is some brands of belts howl louder then others. Have tried various brands that howled now use a Toyota belt.

If going this route there are online Toyota dealers who discount parts but with shipping the price is about what you would pay at local dealer.

No doubt you can find a cheaper belt perhaps the same manufacturer that makes belts for Toyota but for the few dollars difference I no longer bother if belt noise is a concern.

If price is concern shop try Rockauto.com which list a host of brands at various prices.

Have used Gates, Beck/Arnley, Goodyear, Dayco. The other brands listed may also be OK as Rockauto typically does not sell bad products.

I avoid chain auto parts stores for these products as may not know what I am buying in the box I get.

Just personal preference but you did ask.
 
  #6  
Old 12-11-2012, 09:00 AM
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Siloam Springs, AR
Posts: 11
Default

Cash is a concern, but I'll definitely check out the Toyota dealership just to see what their price may be compared to whatever else I find. I'd prefer to spend less, but I know quality matters, so I'm not opposed to spending more if I'm convinced it's worth it.

Is the howling issue just related to wanting the car to run quieter, or is it indicative of damage being done to the engine in some way? Personally, if the only difference between a Toyota belt and a cheaper brand is that the cheaper brand makes more noise when it runs, that's not an issue for me at all.
 
  #7  
Old 12-11-2012, 11:58 AM
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: PTW
Posts: 11,613
Default

Guessing a Toyota belt is $40.

The howl is only an annoyance that sooner or later one gets used to. As after replacing the original factory belt which was quiet with an aftermarket one thinks, this belt really whines.

Can't link belt cost with noise. Must be something to do with the tooth design on the belt and how well this matches that of the sprocket.

There are no safety concerns in using other belt brands.

As stated a personal preference.

If cost is a concern call the autopart stores for prices then compare with Rockauto. Many times even with shipping the cost is cheaper via internet. Search the internet and this site for a 5% off discount code.

There are of course other websites with discount parts.

A few tips when changing the belt.

When removing the upper engine mount bolts (3) from the block suggest using a 6 point box wrench rather then 12 point. These bolts can be very tight, a few owners who used a 12 point found they were rounding off the heads. These bolts have limited to start with, no sense risking head damage by using a 12 point tool.

Do use a harmonic balance puller that screws onto the pulley hub. Claw type pullers risk pulling the two part pulley apart.

Releasing the idler that is under spring tension can cause the belt to move. The result is the cam/crank alignment is off by one tooth. Always recheck alignment after rotating the crank 2 times CW by hand.

The crank pulley bolt can be very tight. Review past posts at this site for methods of holding the pulley still while removing the bolt.

In theory the engine needs re-timing

Sometimes after a timing belt change the engine barely runs or idles. All returns to normal after a few restarts.
 
  #8  
Old 12-12-2012, 08:49 AM
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Siloam Springs, AR
Posts: 11
Default

Looking through the Rockauto catalog now. Do I need to buy a Timing Belt Component Kit, or just the belt by itself? Not sure what else is included in the kits and if they're necessary for the replacement.
 
  #9  
Old 12-12-2012, 01:00 PM
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: PTW
Posts: 11,613
Default

A kit includes the idler pulleys.

How many miles are on the engine and current timing belt components such as idler pulleys plus seals and water pump? How much money do you want to spend?

The suggested belt requirement mileage is 60K, replacing the belt requires time and effort. When replacing the belt some owners prefer to replace whatever else they think may need it as why risk needing to take the engine apart again before the next belt change.

The idlers seldom fail but can become noisy.

Other items to check are the cam, crank and oil pump seals, check for leakage.

Some owners replace the water pump at around 120K just as a precaution. Check for bearing free play and binding.

Have had to take these engines apart mid belt change due to oil pump seal leaks.

As stated above it depends on what the current condition of these items, mileage and a decision by the owner as to how much work and money to spend.

If you are OK with the chance of needing to take the engine apart before next belt change then just replace the belt. Do check the above items listed for leakage, binding of bearings, etc.

Toyota changed the spring design on the idler that pulls the belt tight. If you have a Toyota dealer nearby might pick up the new improved spring, only a few dollars.
 
  #10  
Old 12-13-2012, 08:45 AM
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Siloam Springs, AR
Posts: 11
Default

It's possible the timing belt was never changed on this vehicle, and it's at 125,000 miles. I bought it used a couple months ago and I'm finally getting around to catching it up on maintenance. The previous owner couldn't remember ever changing it, and he'd owned it for more than 10 years. All that to say, I think I'll probably go for the whole kit to be on the safe side. :-)

Thank you so much for your advice and your patience with a newbie!
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: '95 Camry Coupe DX Timing Belt Replacement


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.