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Old 08-26-2015, 11:47 AM
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Transaxle Axle Shaft Seals Leaking

  #1  
Old 12-21-2011, 09:41 AM
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Default Transaxle Axle Shaft Seals Leaking

I am seeing leakage from the axle seals in the transaxle case. I do not want to go to the extra work of pulling my axles to change these seals out. My car is a 1995 2.2L with auto transmission. I am thinking of trying the Lucas product for transmissions in hopes that it will cause the seals to stop leaking or slow the leakage down. My question is this: Does the transaxle have it's own fluid separate from the transmission or does it use the transmission fluid from the transmission? I see that there is a place on the transaxle to fill and drain Any info/feedback on this topic is appreciated
 
  #2  
Old 12-21-2011, 10:39 AM
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The diff fluid is separate.

You can try additives but don't assume they will be successful.

Given the diff fluid is separate monitor the leakage rate and add fluid as required to prevent the diff from running out, this has happened.
 
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Old 12-21-2011, 11:53 AM
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I understand now. I wasn't certain if the differential fluid was isolated from the transmission fluid. I understand too, that it is a pain in the buttocks to change the diff. fluid I am unceratin as to whether I will attempt due to the difficulty in accessing the diff. fill plug Might have to pay to have the diff. fluid changed
 
  #4  
Old 12-21-2011, 01:03 PM
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Access the filler plugs is easier if you have the tools.

Of course you need to get under the car. Use a box wrench to prevent stripping the plug hex heads. If your going to drain the fluid make sure the filler plug can be loosed before draining as some have found the filler plug frozen.

Buy a funnel with a long flexible hose snout where one end can be place into the filler hole while the other extends up into the engine compartment.

The right funnel design makes the job a lot easier and less messy.

Fill the diff with trans fluid until it starts running out the filler hole.

Do check the fluid level as you don't want to run out!
 
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:25 PM
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Do check the fluid level as you don't want to run out!
yup, this one is very necessary... while doing mine I remember how much I spend on this.
 
  #6  
Old 12-22-2011, 06:32 PM
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The next project on my '95 Camry is to drain and fill the differential. I still plan to add a Lucas additive (I just have not figured out which one will work best). If the fill and drain plugs come out ok, I think I can get the fresh lube back in the diff. with a funnel and hose attached to it.
 
  #7  
Old 12-22-2011, 08:36 PM
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$6 fluid pump from Walmart. I have 2 of those.
realistically speaking, it takes about 25-30 minutes per side to pull halfshaft out, replace seal, and put it back in. if you know what you doing and have HD compressor and impact wrench, along with proper size socket.
 
  #8  
Old 12-22-2011, 09:24 PM
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Have impact and compressor but not socket. What size is socket and what is the correct torque on the nut? Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-2011, 10:55 AM
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30 MM.

Best read up on process first. The left and right side axles are constructed and installed differently. You will need to know the differences to remove each.

Suggest you do one side at a time and plan on spending the day or in some cases a weekend.

The passengers side is more difficult and can be most difficult to remove if the carrier bearing is frozen in its housing from rust (it happens).

The impact wrench may not be enough power as the nut is torqued to 217 lb-ft.

When re-installing the axles into the diff housing take care not to nick the diff seal as this will cause leaks.
 
  #10  
Old 12-23-2011, 08:45 PM
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oh, and I have to correct myself, old fool. you don't really even need to have major tools. all you need to do is pop lower ball joint loose, so that hub swings out, maybe - and I say - maybe - disconnect McPherson, pop half shaft out of differential, and swing it out. reason I say - maybe, is because on some cars, you can swing hub out with McPherson still connected. maybe loosen 3 bolts on the top.
mof, I had it done 2 yrs ago on our 94 Corolla, when center bolt was jammed to the point that I had entire front lifted up in the air trying to break it loose. had to replace that seal, as it was leaking, and I was selling.
but yes, if you have never done those, reading helps. right size socket comes from any parts store as free rental, is called "front end socket kit" has everything up to size 36mm I believe.
you can drive to a nearest tire shop, ask them to loosen those center bolts just enough for you to drive safe home and undo it with breaker bar and cheat pipe. of course, needs to be re-torqued thereafter again. that's what I did before I got my 1200 pound foot impact wrench.
 

Last edited by ukrkoz; 12-23-2011 at 08:47 PM.

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