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Auto transmission problems

  #1  
Old 07-26-2018, 03:14 AM
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Default Auto transmission problems

Hi there, I have a 1999 3.0L V6 Camry with the 1MZ engine and automatic transmission.

I've had a sort of grinding noise coming from the front of the car for a while now. I have been trying to fix this and originally thought it could be a binding disk so swapped all brake components out both side, no change. Then I replaced both wheel bearings, not that either. When I was driving the car a couple days ago the auto trans just stopped working. There was gquite a bit of vibration and a few judders first of all and then it felt like ot slipped out of gear, I was going up a slight incline at the time. The shifter stick still operated, but no gears would engage and the engine just revved as if the car was in neutral or park. I got recovered home and checked the fluid level the next day as had fairly recently had a service. The auto trans fluid was overfilled and I pulled out 1.8L extra fluid. Could this have been the sole cause of the problem? And if so why whould that be?

It does select gears and drives now, but I'm a bit reluctant to take it far until I know a bit more, please help someone

Thank you

John
 

Last edited by 1MZ-FE; 07-26-2018 at 03:31 AM.
  #2  
Old 07-26-2018, 11:15 AM
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Are you doing the work or a shop?

How much higher on the trans dip stick was the overfill?

Overfilling can cause the fluid to foam. This can cause shifting issues, poor lubrication leading to part wear, slipping.

However, even with a failing trans due to wear grinding noises are unusual. Might drop the trans pan and inspect for signs of excess metal debris.
 
  #3  
Old 08-03-2018, 06:45 PM
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Sounds like the torque convertor gave out.

I used to ran a transmission shop back in the day, and either way the transmission is going to have to come out, its not an overfilled fluid problem.

However, that transmission was used by Toyota forever so you have a few options, and you need to ask yourself a few questions.

1. Are you planing to keep the car for many years to come? If so then I would just rebuild it myself, as they are not that hard as people think, especially with Youtube. Just find a YT video of someone doing a rebuild, and follow it to a tee.

This way you're killing two birds with one stone. First you learn something, and know the job was done right. Find a rebuild kit that has Raybestos clutch plates as the rebuilt trans should last forever. Also, by a new torque convertor. I've bought several from, gasp, wait for it............Autozone, and so far they have held up better than the TC's I've bought for over $500 [AZ's torque convertor was around $250. Also check Rockauto online as they usually beat any ones price if you're willing to wait for the part to be delivered.].

2. If you're not planing on keeping the car very long, but can't afford a new car at the moment, just buy a transmission used. This is where you're rolling the dice as ALL of them will have 80k miles, don't matter if its 580k miles, it will be marked at 80k. Usually most reputable yards will give you a guarantee, BUT, unless you do the installation, its going to get expensive fast paying someone to be swapping bad transmission after bad transmission as there really isn't a way to know for sure if they are good, or not just by looking at them.

3. Have a shop [NOT AMCO], rebuild the transmission. This is going to cost a good bit of money depending on your area.

Also, if you do want to keep the car forever [much simpler than new cars, and usually less expensive to maintain vs new] I would suggest buying the biggest transmission cooler you can fit in front of the radiator. There is a saying in the trans rebuild business, and its true, HEAT is the number one killer of transmissions.

Good luck.
 
  #4  
Old 09-05-2018, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by toyomoho View Post
Are you doing the work or a shop?

How much higher on the trans dip stick was the overfill?

Overfilling can cause the fluid to foam. This can cause shifting issues, poor lubrication leading to part wear, slipping.

However, even with a failing trans due to wear grinding noises are unusual. Might drop the trans pan and inspect for signs of excess metal debris.
It was about twice as high as it should have been when hot (from the hot mark)
 
  #5  
Old 09-05-2018, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by M-train View Post
Sounds like the torque convertor gave out.

I used to ran a transmission shop back in the day, and either way the transmission is going to have to come out, its not an overfilled fluid problem.

However, that transmission was used by Toyota forever so you have a few options, and you need to ask yourself a few questions.

1. Are you planing to keep the car for many years to come? If so then I would just rebuild it myself, as they are not that hard as people think, especially with Youtube. Just find a YT video of someone doing a rebuild, and follow it to a tee.

This way you're killing two birds with one stone. First you learn something, and know the job was done right. Find a rebuild kit that has Raybestos clutch plates as the rebuilt trans should last forever. Also, by a new torque convertor. I've bought several from, gasp, wait for it............Autozone, and so far they have held up better than the TC's I've bought for over $500 [AZ's torque convertor was around $250. Also check Rockauto online as they usually beat any ones price if you're willing to wait for the part to be delivered.].

2. If you're not planing on keeping the car very long, but can't afford a new car at the moment, just buy a transmission used. This is where you're rolling the dice as ALL of them will have 80k miles, don't matter if its 580k miles, it will be marked at 80k. Usually most reputable yards will give you a guarantee, BUT, unless you do the installation, its going to get expensive fast paying someone to be swapping bad transmission after bad transmission as there really isn't a way to know for sure if they are good, or not just by looking at them.

3. Have a shop [NOT AMCO], rebuild the transmission. This is going to cost a good bit of money depending on your area.

Also, if you do want to keep the car forever [much simpler than new cars, and usually less expensive to maintain vs new] I would suggest buying the biggest transmission cooler you can fit in front of the radiator. There is a saying in the trans rebuild business, and its true, HEAT is the number one killer of transmissions.

Good luck.
I love the car and was hoping it would last quite a few years more yet yes and I usually do most of my own work. I had considered undertaking the job myself, but you have definately helped to sway me into stop considering and just get on with it, so thanks for that! I'd rather not let a shop do the work as it will cost a fortune and as you say, there is no way you know it has been done properly. I have bought an Avensis for now and so will drop the engine and transmission and overhaul the lot while I'm at it!

Thanks for the info and inspiration dude!

 
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