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Replace broken timing belt/need help timing

  #1  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:14 PM
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Default Replace broken timing belt/need help timing

Hi all, we have a 1996 Camry LE (4 cylinder, 2.2L) and the timing belt broke. Getting all the parts tomorrow & hope to get it fixed. Plan on changing the water pump & some seals to fix some oil leaks as well(since I'll have access). Anyway, it has been quite some time since I've had to do the timing on any car so I could use some help. I've seen some good internet posts on this board and another, but I wish they were more detailed in the area of doing/setting the timing when the timing belt is broken/off. I see many posts about being a "tooth off" and the trouble that can cause and I don't want to have that problem. I also see post references to top dead center (TDC) & I am not 100% sure how to set that, or if I even have to worry about that if I line up some marks on the crankshaft pulley & the camshaft pulley. (Not 100 % sure of what marks either). Anyone have a good (and simple) explanation or a link that details how to set the timing (pictures would be helpfull too). I appreciate everyone's help & I thank you all in advance for your assistance!!
 
  #2  
Old 01-05-2012, 10:30 PM
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See link below:

http://www.justanswer.com/uploads/sk..._91_celica.pdf

Much of the information on installing the belt involves reusing the old belt or installing a new Toyota belt which may have alignment marks.

What also may be confusing you is the crank rotates 2 times for every 1 revolution of the cam. As such possible for the crank marks to be set at TDC but the cam timing marks be off by 180 degrees. Since the belt is off no need to be concerned about this.

With top timing cover off, rotate cam pulley CW until the hole in the one spoke lines up with the mark on the upper cam bearing mount that is behind the pulley. Look through the hole to align the mark. This is the TDC position for the cams.

The cam pulley will be hard to rotate, might need a strap wrench or configure a tool that engages the large pulley holes to use as leverage.

Before removing lower timing belt cover rotate crank pulley to align mark on pulley with 0 degree timing mark on cover. This is 0 degrees at TDC for the crank. When the lower timing cover is off observe the location of the crank key way and perhaps mark the belt pulley to maintain proper alignment as the reference marks will be gone with the cover removed.

Install the belt per directions. Before installing the covers rotate the crank by hand CW 2 revs and recheck all the marks.

If the timing if off one tooth either direction remove and reinstall belt.

Sometimes when the belt slack is taken out by releasing the idler bearing the belt can pull the cam pulley in one direction resulting is the timing off by one tooth. If this happens reinstall the belt such that the timing alignment is now off one tooth and the belt pulling on the pulley brings the timing back into alignment.

Always recheck your work by rotating the crank 2 times CW.
 
  #3  
Old 01-05-2012, 11:26 PM
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I suggest to fix the timing belt first before getting to another plan it would become a problem in the future :P
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-2012, 06:16 PM
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Hi all, We just got the timing covers off (top & bottom) and the belt is NOT broken in half like we thought. We had seen little chunks of the belt material so we knew something is wrong and figured the belt had broken, especially since the rotor inside the distributor did not move when we cranked the engine briefly. However, when we got the lower timing belt cover off, we can see lots of missing teeth from between the crank pulley up to the oil pump drive pulley?? Not sure what could have caused this?? We turned the crank to help loosen the crankshaft bolt so we know the engine/crankshaft turns. Anyone have an idea? Could it be the oil pump/drive?? Basically 5 to 6 inches of teeth on the timing belt are shaved off between the crankshaft pulley & the oil pump drive pulley. However, the oil pump moves with a little effort, along with the camshaft pulley, the idler, the tension-er, and crankshaft pulley. There is a LOT of oil that has inside the timing cover so perhaps the excess oil caused the problem, or at least contributed to the trouble. Well, I am going to clean the oil and engine gunk that is on the parts we taken off so far and check this board a little later to see if anyone has any advice or suggestions. Thanks again in advance for all assistance!
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-2012, 07:57 PM
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Could be a belt failure, they can shred teeth if getting up in miles or issues with oil getting on them.

The oil pump drive shaft seal can leak oil but never encountered one freezing up.

The water pump can freeze up but not common.

Look at the oil drip pattern as an aid to determine the source. The cam, crank and oil oil pump drive shaft seals can leak.

Since as there is a leak suggest changing all seals.

The oil pump needs to be removed from the front engine cover housing to take it apart and access the seal.

Once off the pump is of place the inner rotor attached to the drive shaft in a soft jaw vice to allow removing the nut holding the pulley on. With pulley off the shaft/rotor unit can pulled of the pump body to access the lip seal.

If there is a dealer close by suggest getting all the seals from. There is a preformed o-ring between the oil pump and engine housing, get this also.

When mating the two oil pump rotors make sure the dots on each rotor face the same direction before installing the oil pump unit into the engine housing.
 
  #6  
Old 01-07-2012, 12:18 AM
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Thanks all. I think changing ALL the seals is a good idea, especially since there is so much work involved to change the timing belt & water pump. Right now I'm stuck trying to get the camshaft pulley off. I would imagine there is a special tool for it but I don't have it. Tried wrapping the old timing belt around the camshaft pulley as I turn the bolt but it keeps moving. Any ideas on how to get the camshaft pulley off? Also, should I use any kind of gasket sealant on the water pump or oil pump o-ring-gasket?
 
  #7  
Old 01-07-2012, 11:20 AM
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Obtain a section of wood or flat steel long enough to make a good lever.

Drill a couple of holes in one end whose holes spacing fits the holes on one side of the cam pulley.

Install a couple of bolts in the holes with the bolt head sticking out. They need only be 1/4 inch in diameter.

Install the tool with the heads inside the holes, the head keeping the bolt engaging the side of the pulley hole and keeping the bolt from from sliding out of the hole. Use the tools as a lever to hold the pulley as you turn the nut. It need not be a fancy tool, you are only going to use it twice.

Oil O-ring needs no gasket sealant.

For water pump or other sealing needs recommend the sealant in the link below:

Amazon.com: Permatex 82180 Ultra Black Maximum Oil Resistance RTV Silicone Gasket Maker - 3.35 oz.: Automotive

Once the parts are bolted together let the sealant cure 24 hours before starting engine.
 
  #8  
Old 01-07-2012, 02:59 PM
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I don/ see screw or bolt holes in the pulley, just the spoke holes/Spaces on the cam pulley--Is that what you mean?? I've seen some pictures of some home-made cam wrenches, but I can't figure out where the two bolts go??
 
  #9  
Old 01-07-2012, 07:06 PM
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The water pump moves OK. Now we are trying to get all the bolts off the water pump & noticed one hole has a Phillips screw head, which naturally is to tight to get to turn. UUUUGGGGGHHH!!!! And we are having NO LUCK getting the cam pulley off. Two steps forward & one back, or the other way around. Anyone know some shortcuts? Don't want to pull the valve cover off if I don't have to. Trying to fabricate a home-made flat bar tool to hold the camshaft pulley while I turn the bolt. I really want to change all the seals since there was so much oil on the old belt.
 
  #10  
Old 01-07-2012, 07:28 PM
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Install the bolts into the section of wood so the shank portion of the bolt extends out from the wood. Then position the wood now with the bolts installed such that the bolt shanks go into the holes in the spokes.

The above tool will then engage the holes via the bolts and you can hold the end of the wood section to use as leverage in keeping the pulley from moving.

If you have the old belt can also try to make a homemade strap wrench.

Don't remember any Phillips head screw?

You should be able to remove the pump and housing behind it by removing 3 bolts on the firewall side. If the Phillips head screw is not one of these, one the unit is of can work on it on the bench.

However you will need to now replace the O-ring on the bypass pipe that slides into the back of the pump housing.
 
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